Yarchagumba Tea

cordyceps sinensis

click for an article on use and harvesting in Nepal

Yarchagumba, which literally means summer plant and winter insect in Tibetan, is a rare and unique herb that grows in the meadows above 3,500 meters (11,483 feet) in the Himalayan region of Nepal. Yarchagumba Tea’s chief ingredient is Cordyceps sinensis, known as caterpillar fungus. Caterpillar fungi are the result of a parasitic relationship between the fungus and the larva of the ghost moth. The fungus germinates in living organisms (in some cases the larvae), kills and mummifies the insect, and then the cordyceps grows from the body of the insect. It is known in the West as a medicinal mushroom and its use has a long history in Traditional Chinese medicine as well as Traditional Tibetan medicine and regarded as a life saving tonic and a remedy for headache, toothache or any other disease.

Medicinally it is also considered potent at strengthening lung and kidneys, increasing energy and vitality, stopping hemorrhage, decreasing phleg, used for impotence, backache, to increase sperm production and to increase blood production, used specifically for excess tiredness, chronic cough and asthma, impotence, debility, anemia, to build the bone marrow, for shortness of breath, asthma, impotency, emission, soreness of loins and knees, dizziness and tinnitus, to strengthen the immune system of tumor patients who have received radiotherapy, Chemotherapy or surgery, and as natural Viagra.

Almost 50% of the annual supply of yarsagumba comes from Dolpa, one of the poorest regions of Nepal. It can be bought in teabags, combined with other ingredients, from local supplier, Everest Herbs:

Chamomile flower (Matricaria chamomilla)
Cordyceps/Yarchagumba (Cordyceps sinensis)
Cinnamon leaf (Cinnamomum tamala)
Ginger (Zingiber officinale)
Gurjo/Tinospora Guluncha (Tinospora cordifolia)
Lemongrass (Cymbopon flexuosus)
Mint leaf (Mentha arvensis)
Mulberry leaf (Morus alba)
Shilajit – Purified (Asphaltum)

Please note that nevermindthebotox.com is not involved in the Yarchagumba trade.

Some science – Abstract from article: The Scientific Rediscovery of an Ancient Chinese Herbal Medicine: Cordyceps sinensis : (Stanford University School of Medicine, California, Shanghai Medical University, China, Emeritus, University of California, Armana Research, Inc., Gibsons, British Columbia, Canada)

This review presents Cordyceps sinensis (Berk.) Sacc., a fungus highly
valued in China as a tonic food and herbal medicine. The extant records show the continued use of C. sinensis is now centuries old. The major chemical, pharmacological, and toxicological studies on C. sinensis and the various derived, cultured, fermented mycelial products currently in use are reviewed from the English and Chinese literature. Preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies and clinical blinded or open-label trials in to date over 2000
patients are reviewed. These studies show the main activities of the fungus in oxygen-free radical scavenging, antisenescence, endocrine, hypolipidemic, antiatherosclerotic, and sexual function-restorative activities. The safety of
the fungus, its effects on the nervous system, glucose metabolism, the respiratory, hepatic, cardiovascular, and immune systems, immunologic disease, inflammatory conditions, cancer, and diseases of the kidney will be reviewed in the second part of this article to be published in the winter issue of this journal.

Download full article and more from Everest Herbs in Nepal (PDFs)

ngredients below for more information )
Chamomile flower (Matricaria chamomilla)
Cinnamon leaf (Cinnamomum tamala)
Ginger (Zingiber officinale)
Gurjo/Tinospora Guluncha (Tinospora cordifolia)
Lemongrass (Cymbopon flexuosus)
Mint leaf (Mentha arvensis)
Mulberry leaf (Morus alba)
Shilajit – Purified (Asphaltum)

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